Category Archives: Glaciation

Year 13 Pre release for Unit 3 and 4.

Email Uvhsgeography@gmail.com if you can’t access.

I have started the Google Drive links for Unit 3 and Unit 4 pre-release.

Both folders can be found through THIS LINK.

Please make sure you add  research you conduct over the Easter break to the folders. This could be PDF’s, maps, web-links, videos, documents.

There are two master documents with the questions on and a few notes. Please continue to add and annotate details and links to these questions.

Year 13 – Glacier distribution

Antarctic glaciers

This is a good science blog on glaciation that is worth following. Click on the link above. The information below is taken from the most recent blog entitled ‘Mapping the world’s glaciers’

There are 198,000 glaciers, (or about 400, 000 if you include those smaller than 0.1km2) according to the Randolph Glacier Inventory.

Together, these glaciers cover 726,000 km2. The region with the most ice is the Antarctic and Subantarctic, with 132,900 km2, closely followed by Arctic Canada North (104,900 km2)….. Glaciers cover 0.5% of the Earth’s land surface

image

This map shows the global distribution of glaciers. The diameter of the circle shows the area covered. The area covered by tidewater glaciers is shown in blue. The number refers to the RGI region. source.

Cold climate variation around the world

In Mr Monteith’s lesson on Wednesday we briefly reviewed the key factors that influence climate before examining the climate characteristics of  three cold environment locations: The European Alps, northern Siberia, and Antarctica.

I mentioned Google Earth which I would strongly recommend all of you install on a computer. Alternatively the school computers should all have Google Earth installed.

A few layers which are worth investigating and saving in Google Earth:

The National Snow and Ice Data Center has a range of different layers showing ice extent in the polar regions and pictures of cold environments around the world.

BRITICE – This is a very exciting project led by a team from Sheffield University. They are attempting to bring together glacial landforms and features created by the ice sheet that covered the British Isles in the last glaciation and present the data in downloadable KML files for use in Google Earth. You can also view the landforms in PDF format. We will be using this site in future lessons.

NOAA ocean currents map – This is the direct link to the KML file that we opened in class that projects global ocean currents in Google earth. It is a useful reminder for the ocean/atmosphere circulation work we looked at in the previous week.

Earth Wind map – Although this is not a Google earth file it is a very interesting website that displays current weather, ocean circulation. By clicking on ‘Earth’ in the bottom left of the page you bring up a control panal. You can change the altitude that is projected by clicking on the numbers next to the height line. Altitude is projected in hPa – Hectopascals, a measure of air pressure, so lower pressure equals a higher altitude.

I want you to come to the lesson next week having accessed at least one of these links or websites.

Mr Monteith