Here are your geography links for the week ending….. 20th July

Each week during term I will try to post links to relevant, interesting articles related to geography, as well as some cool clips. As everything is linked to geography it should be an easy task……

  • London has gone 3D in google maps. Have an explore here
  • Is it a bird? Is it a plane? No, it's the Spanish plume. Find out the how this weather phenomena works in this excellent BBC weather clip.

 

Have a good holiday!

 

 

5 apps every geographer should have

As we head into the summer holidays, I shiver at the thought that UVHS sixth formers could go without their weekly dose of geography. After all, 5 lessons of geog a week helps you work, rest and play…. Sorry, I’ll stop now.

These apps should help keep you on the geography ball over the summer. Let me know if you have any that you think should be added to the list.

Igeology – Find out what rocks are under your feet courtesy of the British Geological Survey. Android and ITunes

Google maps – a geographer should always know where they are and what is around them…. Good local, place specific detail. Android and ITunes

BBC weather – Hopefully it won’t rain all summer. Great weather detail and easy to use. Android and ITunes

Disaster alert – Tsunami? Tropical cyclone? Earthquake or volcano? Be alerted when and where these occur in real time. It’s scary how much is happening. Android and ITunes

NASA images of change – Compare historic and present day photos of glaciers, cities and landscapes to see physical changes over time. The glacial recession photos are a striking example of climate change in action. ITunes only.

Here are your geography links for the week ending…..13th July 2014

Each week during term I will try to post links to relevant, interesting articles related to geography, as well as some cool clips. As everything is linked to geography it should be an easy task……

  • The census is like a geographer's bible of the UK that is refreshed and updated every ten years. Here are a few cool choropleth link displaying a wealth of census 2011 data.

 

 

 

 

Here are your geography links for….. week ending 4/7/2014

Geography snippets from around the world this week.

  • We’re looking at cold environments at the moment, this BBC article gives you an idea of how ownership of one cold environment, Antarctica, is more complicated than it first seems. It may be cold, dry and inhospitable, but it turns out everybody wants a chunk of the white continent.

 

Cold climate variation around the world

In Mr Monteith’s lesson on Wednesday we briefly reviewed the key factors that influence climate before examining the climate characteristics of  three cold environment locations: The European Alps, northern Siberia, and Antarctica.

I mentioned Google Earth which I would strongly recommend all of you install on a computer. Alternatively the school computers should all have Google Earth installed.

A few layers which are worth investigating and saving in Google Earth:

The National Snow and Ice Data Center has a range of different layers showing ice extent in the polar regions and pictures of cold environments around the world.

BRITICE – This is a very exciting project led by a team from Sheffield University. They are attempting to bring together glacial landforms and features created by the ice sheet that covered the British Isles in the last glaciation and present the data in downloadable KML files for use in Google Earth. You can also view the landforms in PDF format. We will be using this site in future lessons.

NOAA ocean currents map – This is the direct link to the KML file that we opened in class that projects global ocean currents in Google earth. It is a useful reminder for the ocean/atmosphere circulation work we looked at in the previous week.

Earth Wind map – Although this is not a Google earth file it is a very interesting website that displays current weather, ocean circulation. By clicking on ‘Earth’ in the bottom left of the page you bring up a control panal. You can change the altitude that is projected by clicking on the numbers next to the height line. Altitude is projected in hPa – Hectopascals, a measure of air pressure, so lower pressure equals a higher altitude.

I want you to come to the lesson next week having accessed at least one of these links or websites.

Mr Monteith